Links for January 17, 2011: “An American Conversation” on Tucson, Drug Prohibition, etc.

January 16, 2011
  • Reason.tv once again lives up to its name.

  • On January 5, 2011, a gang of gun-wielding thugs rampaged into a private residence and killed a grandfather of 12. My question is: Were the killers inspired by violent “drug war” rhetoric, or were they simply crazy? It is time for an American Conversation on the tragedy in Framingham. Raids like this are conducted over 100 times each day across America. Yes, people die.

  • Vodpod videos no longer available.

    ANN COULTER: I have one statement for you: the welfare state. No, people can not do whatever they want to do and live however they want to live, as long as Ann has to pay for it, when they can’t hold a job and raise their own kids and buy their own food and pay for their own rent. You get rid of the welfare state and we’ll talk about people sitting home and shooting heroin all day, but right now, oh, and now I have to pay for their health care!

    JOHN STOSSEL: So because we have a social welfare system, we have to give up these other freedoms?

    ANN: Yeah, as long as Ann is paying for it.

    Ann Coulter is a little more forthright than the average prohibitionist. Her argument is that since the government is forcing her to pay for something, then it might as well be what she wants most of all, which is to bastille her fellow citizens when she disapproves of their private, personal conduct. If she weren’t forced to pay for something, she might then be open to not paying out of her own pocket to imprison people who have committed no crimes against her or others.

    If Ann doesn’t want government health care money and living expenses to go to drug addicts, then her solution is counter-productive. Even prior to ObamaCare, the only people in the United States of America who have been constitutionally entitled to state-funded health care have been prisoners. Her argument, essentially, is: “I don’t want to pay for drug addicts’ health care food, room, and board, but I love throwing them all in jail, where I’m guaranteed to pay for all of their health care, food, room, and board. It is more important to Ann that we throw drug users in jail than it is that we save Ann’s tax money.”

    That is the logic of prohibition. For more hemming, hawing, evading, and stammering, see part 2:

    Vodpod videos no longer available.

    You can decide for yourselves whether the logic of prohibition wins the day. Read the rest of this entry »

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    links for 2010-02-15

    February 16, 2010
    1. ACLJ | The Parade of Horribles

      Imagine if everyone exercised their religious liberty. What a horrible world that would be, right? Sekulow asserts that the Satanists and the Wiccans already have a right to meet for religious purposes. This is the same Jay Sekulow who neglected to mention that the Mojave Desert Cross case began when the federal government denied a Buddhist's request to erect a shrine on federally owned land in the vicinity of the cross. Instead, Sekulow carried on as if the horrible, godless people of America attacked the Christian Cross without provocation. Again with the borderline dishonesty.

    2. ACLJ | Context of the Ten Commandments

      I find Sekulow's assessment of the proper context within which to display the Ten Commandments very interesting. I thought he was going to say that if you were teaching theology and you have up quotes and laws from other religious texts, then it should be no trouble to post the Ten. Instead he believes there should be no trouble with the law if the Ten are posted alongside the Bill of Rights and the Declaration of Independence. This is an example of the belief that the Ten Commandments is among America's foundational documents. Despite its influence among our nation's founders, I would not categorize it that way.

    3. NYDailyNews.com | Queens girl Alexa Gonzalez hauled out of school in handcuffs after getting caught doodling on desk

      Queens police have nothing better to do, I guess. Read the rest of this entry »