Peter Schiff and the Daily Show: The trouble is, graphs don’t win arguments.

February 1, 2014

Anyone can read the news to you; The Daily Show promises to feel the news at you.

I thought Jon Stewart was heroic when he took on Paul Begala and Tucker Carlson on Crossfire, exposing media theater and the uncomfortable truth that news organizations essentially take cues on integrity from Comedy Central. I bought it for a long time that Stewart’s The Daily Show was almost an acceptable substitute for cable news. Well, we all got a cold splash of reality last week, when Jon proved to us that his show is really is only comedy, and properly scheduled after puppets making crank phone calls.

Last week, the producers of The Daily Show defamed one of my intellectual heroes, Peter Schiff. Many libertarians criticized Schiff for walking into an obvious trap, but I can understand why Schiff took the bait. He personally appeared on the show in 2009 to speak with host Jon Stewart after having correctly predicted the 2007 financial meltdown. Stewart treated Schiff respectfully, and Schiff won the audience’s approval:

I imagine Schiff was expecting similar respect and thoughtfulness this time around. What he received instead was the following hatchet job, led by comedian Samantha Bee:

Read the rest of this entry »


Links for January 9, 2011: Classic Schiff; Great Greenwald; Comments on the progression of progressive arguments; others….

January 7, 2012
  1. One of my favorite parts of one of my favorite lectures.

  2. I can only imagine what the “horrible aspects of his belief system” are, but that aside, this is one hell of a great article.

  3. I’m noticing a pattern. It goes like this: Step 1): Progressives make some empty, bogus, polemic accusations against businesses and markets. Step 2) Libertarians and free-marketers see right through the accusations and expose their fallacies. Step 3) Progressives return from the drawing board after some time with slightly better developed versions of their accusations. Step 4) These new versions are a little trickier to unravel, but libertarians and free-marketers unravel them just the same. Lather, rinse, repeat. This link and the next link are examples of this pattern in action:  Read the rest of this entry »


Links for December 26, 2007: Another stomach-turning spending visual; Inside the above-board marijuana industry; Cenk Uygur vs. Peter Schiff shoutfest; others….

December 24, 2011
  1. After a while, these become just a bunch of numbers, unhinged from any consequences.

  2. Look at the inside of their facility. You might mistake it for a bank at first glance. Look at the paperwork. Look at the oversight. Face reality: people buy drugs. Now ask yourself: would you rather people buy drugs in places like this, or from criminal thugs on street corners? Read the rest of this entry »


Links for October 31, 2011: Stanhope on Liberty; Voices from the “1%”; Government owns polluted rivers; others….

October 29, 2011
  1. Fifteen minutes of brilliance. (NSFW: Language)

  2. Priceless. Uncut footage available here, here, here, and here. I would love even more. Apparently, the conversation lasted three hours.

  3. A different voice from the 1%, This one from the “tax me” contingent. Sorry. You can raise you own taxes if you want, but you got no moral authority to raise your neighbor’s taxes, as far as I’m concerned.

    I have spent far more hours than I should have these last few weeks … trying to understand who these people are and why they would possibly care about my taxes.

    It’s called empathy. It’s called reciprocity. I make more money than some unfortunate people, but I don’t like the idea of other people reaching into my pockets and taking my money on that account. On the other hand, I don’t think I’m better than everybody else. If there were a rule that said: “You may reach into anyone’s pocket but Tim G.’s.” I would consider that rule to be arbitrary and unfair to others. A more fair rule would be: “Nobody reaches into anyone else’s pockets.” I don’t have a particular love for this guy. I just think there ought to be predictable, non-arbitrary, even-handed rules of private property. Is that so wrong?

    The author also extols the government and union help his family received during his impoverished youth. It’s tough to play the “what if” game, but if the government did not interfere so much in the economy to limit people’s productive capacities there is reason to believe that his youth may not have been as bad as he assumes that it would have been. Again, I don’t have a crystal ball, but another way is possible.  Read the rest of this entry »


My Metal Motivation: Why Gold Is Here To Stay

October 8, 2011

'B' is for 'Bubble'

The word ‘Bubble’ is brought to you by the letter ‘B’.

These are the words of an anonymous critic on my facebook stream, confident that gold is in a bubble destined for collapse. I have taken to occasionally posting the spot gold price to keep it in my readers’ consciousness. My most recent post drew criticism for expressing continued support for gold despite its $375, 20% tumble of late September, 2011. My critic continued:

Havent you learned your bubble 101 from the 08 collapse? … Not quite sure your metal motivation, but it is obviously a freight train that cannot be stopped.

My critic studied business, works in finance, and follows the stock market. I studied mathematics and I’m a lawyer. I have no formal training in either economics or finance. I do not follow the stock market. Yet, I have positioned myself so that I must justify my continued support for gold. Have I learned my bubble 101 from the 2008 collapse? You tell me.  Read the rest of this entry »


Links for Monday, October 3, 2011: Ron Paul on Health Care; Gibson Guitars Raided; The “Monkeysphere”; others….

October 1, 2011
  1. Though Paul spoke to the larger issues of health care and government-backed health insurance–both pivotal in the 2012 election–the audience’s reaction has overshadowed the substance of the exchange between the candidates.

    This is a sort of self-perpetuating observation. The author gives the headline to the clowns in the audience, then observes in bewilderment that the audience’s reaction overshadows the substance of the debate. Gee. How does that happen? Here’s a thought: Try writing an article–with matching headline–about the substance of the debate, and then relegate the peanut gallery’s guffaws to a footnote in the article. Video embedding disabled by request. 😦

  2. Kent Snyder: One man's tragedy is another's opportunity.

    This is one of the most callous, ruthless attacks on Ron Paul’s principles that I have ever read. Ron Paul and his supporters must answer this one.

    Kent was Ron Paul’s 2008 campaign manager. Jesse Benton, the Paul campaign’s communications director apparently said that it was Kent’s idea not to offer insurance due to costs. This apparently was not unusual in the realm of political campaigns.

    He apparently had a pre-existing condition that made insurance prohibitively expensive. Even if the Ron Paul campaign offered insurance, it is unclear to me that Kent would have received it. Kent’s obituary in the Washington Post states that Kent spent two months in a hospital before he died. It is unclear to me how health insurance would have saved his life, even if he had it.

    When we remove the appeal to emotion associated with the man’s death, this a comment only on the outrageous cost of health care. Libertarians like Ron Paul have plenty to teach us about how health care came to be so expensive and what should be done to reduce costs. See, e.g.: True News 46: The Death of Health Care, Part One, John Stossel: Insurance Makes Health Care Far More Expensive.

  3. The government raided Gibson Guitars, alleging dealing in illegally logged wood. Gibson CEO Henry Juszkiewicz defends his company:

    The Indian government allowed the exports. We have a letter from the Indian government that says that it’s absolutely legal to export rosewood and ebony fingerboards, certified letter, and the wood was certified by the Forest Stewardship Council, which is a third-part independent auditor, if you will, that establishes the legality and appropriateness of wood sourcing.  Read the rest of this entry »