Links for January 30, 2012: ACTA is the new SOPA; More on Ron Paul and Racism; others….

January 28, 2012
  1. I can’t commenting on the specifics, as I have not read the agreement, but this much I know: As technology improves, copyright enforcement will become more invasive and more draconian. As I consider intellectual property to be on shaky philosophical ground anyhow, I’d prefer to relinquish it now, a la Stephan Kinsella, than live under the coming police state, a la SOPA, PIPA, and now ACTA.

  2. Just because SOPA may has been tabled, that doesn’t necessarily make the internet a safe place to store and share information.

  3. This tightly knit sweater of criticism leaves a few strings dangling. It deserves a full response. For now, just understand that the alternative to a Civil Rights Act that forces blacks and whites to make nice is not necessarily either government-mandated Jim Crow segregation or segregation reinforced by mob violence. There is another way: Ron Paul’s way, which is not to force anyone to do anything, and to punish those who force their will on others.  Read the rest of this entry »


Links for Monday, June 20: China’s Economic Stimulus; Ludicrous RIAA Damages; What about NPR?; others…

April 17, 2011
  1. Stories about how China’s economy will soon surpass that of the U.S. should not be taken at face value. This is China’s economic stimulus project. This is what a government stimulus project is. A government stimulus project is when the government takes money and resources from the private sector and uses it to make and build things for which there is no genuine demand. Our American stimulus is of the same essential character. Ours is just a little more modest in scale.

  2. Here is a nice article from Niall Ferguson about the choice the American Government will make on our behalf in the near future: Raise taxes and/or cut government. Thomas E. Woods has argued that raising taxes will not solve the problem. There will have to be copious cutting.

  3. With juries like these, who needs dictators? Read the rest of this entry »


Links for November 16, 2010: Some Psychological Stuff, Some Fallacious Stuff, others….

November 14, 2010
  1. Another fascinating diatribe from Stefan Molyneux. My question is: does this not apply equally well to libertarians and anarchists? Is libertarianism not just another ideology?

  2. Large organizations, including government, which is of course the largest organization of all, have actually become completely disconnected with what actually matters to people. … What behavioral economics shows, time after time, is in human behavior and behavioral change there is a very strong disproportionality at work: that actually what changes our behavior and what changes our attitudes toward things is not actually proportional to the degree of expense entailed or to the degree of force that is applied.

  3. After invalidating more than 30,000 Nader-Camejo signatures on dubious and highly technical grounds – for example, because signers used informal names such as “Bill” instead of “William,” or because their current and registered addresses did not match – Commonwealth Court removed the candidates from the ballot. Then it ordered them to pay their challengers more than $80,000 in litigation costs.

  4. Read the rest of this entry »


Links for July 6, 2010: Kagan on Corporate Speech, an Easter Egg in the Health Care Bill, Knocking “Deficit Hawks”, others….

July 4, 2010
  1. Elena Kagan: How hard will she fight corporate free speech? (Photo: Doc Searls)

    An attorney’s job is to be a zealous advocate for her client. I becomes a sort of theater of the absurd. It does not necessarily follow that she will retain this mentality on the bench. On the other hand, perhaps it is not so wise to turn someone who has built a career arguing on behalf of the government into a Supreme Court Justice. Habits are sometimes hard to break. Contrast with Ralph Nader’s 36 Questions for Elena Kagan, wherein the author’s first ten questions attempt to gauge Kagan’s support for free corporate speech, seemingly unawares of her very office’s zealous efforts to limit it.

  2. I wouldn’t be surprised if this were one of many Easter eggs hidden in this bill that the American people did not bargain for. That’s generally how sprawling legislation works, is it not?

  3. The FAA has granted the company an extra 110 pounds to the LSA limit of 1,320 pounds maximum takeoff weight. Terrafugia says this will allow the extra safety equipment and a still allow the airplane to compete with other LSA aircraft in terms of range and the amount of payload it can carry.

    Kudos to the FAA for getting out of the way of progress. Read the rest of this entry »