Some Bunch O’ Links: Possibilianism; Greece; Portugal; Unheeded Prophets; others….

March 6, 2012
  1. I’m going to suggest that the next time someone says, “Well, you should just ‘cowboy up’ and commit to a decision,” we can say, “You know what? What I’d rather do is geek out.” And the idea with geeking out is, I’m going to be creative and come up with new narratives. I’m going to be comfortable holding multiple possibilities in mind.”

    I think this is good advice for learning economics. Some pairs of theories directly contradict each other. In those cases, you gotta pick one. Other theories don’t directly contradict each other. These could both be held in mind, and neither should be dismissed until better explanations are uncovered. One might weigh them. One might favor one of the other, but the other can not be dismissed until it is directly contradicted.

  2. Last May, Portugal received a $104 billion bailout from the European Union and International Monetary Fund, in exchange for deep spending cuts and structural reforms. … After a decade of easy credit, Portuguese are scrambling to make ends meet.

    Government can not keep bailing out and inflating ad infinitum. Recovery is a process. As Peter Schiff said, “Sometimes medicine tastes bad, but you have to swallow it.” Also, what else is government doing to thwart recovery? The article says debt keeps rising despite cuts. Why?

  3. I found this episode of This American Life to be helpful. If that broadcast is to be believed, then the dumbest economic policy of all was letting that vampire state Greece into the Eurozone in the first place.

Read the rest of this entry »


Links for Monday, October 3, 2011: Ron Paul on Health Care; Gibson Guitars Raided; The “Monkeysphere”; others….

October 1, 2011
  1. Though Paul spoke to the larger issues of health care and government-backed health insurance–both pivotal in the 2012 election–the audience’s reaction has overshadowed the substance of the exchange between the candidates.

    This is a sort of self-perpetuating observation. The author gives the headline to the clowns in the audience, then observes in bewilderment that the audience’s reaction overshadows the substance of the debate. Gee. How does that happen? Here’s a thought: Try writing an article–with matching headline–about the substance of the debate, and then relegate the peanut gallery’s guffaws to a footnote in the article. Video embedding disabled by request. ūüė¶

  2. Kent Snyder: One man's tragedy is another's opportunity.

    This is one of the most callous, ruthless attacks on Ron Paul’s principles that I have ever read. Ron Paul and his supporters must answer this one.

    Kent was Ron Paul’s 2008 campaign manager.¬†Jesse Benton, the Paul campaign’s communications director¬†apparently said¬†that it was Kent’s idea not to offer insurance due to costs. This apparently was not unusual in the realm of political campaigns.

    He apparently had a pre-existing condition that made insurance prohibitively expensive. Even if the Ron Paul campaign offered insurance, it is unclear to me that Kent would have received it.¬†Kent’s obituary in the Washington Post states that Kent spent two months in a hospital before he died. It is unclear to me how health insurance would have saved his life, even if he had it.

    When we remove the appeal to emotion associated with the man’s death, this a comment only on the outrageous cost of health care. Libertarians like Ron Paul have plenty to teach us about how health care came to be so expensive and what should be done to reduce costs. See, e.g.: True News 46: The Death of Health Care, Part One, John Stossel: Insurance Makes Health Care Far More Expensive.

  3. The government raided Gibson Guitars, alleging dealing in illegally logged wood. Gibson CEO Henry Juszkiewicz defends his company:

    The Indian government allowed the exports. We have a letter from the Indian government that says that it’s absolutely legal to export rosewood and ebony fingerboards, certified letter, and the wood was certified by the Forest Stewardship Council, which is a third-part independent auditor, if you will, that establishes the legality and appropriateness of wood sourcing.¬† Read the rest of this entry »


Links of August 9th, 2011: The Prophet Ron; S&P Debt Downgrade; Fashion Police; a Liter of Light; others…..

August 7, 2011
  1. Ron Paul predicted the fall of the housing market as early as 2003.

    I think I’m leaning toward Gary Johnson this time around because I like him better on social issues, but I will gladly pass this on, as I would be just about as satisfied with a Ron Paul win in 2012.

  2. Who are “Standard & Poor’s” and why do they hate America? Either they are with us or they are with the terrorists.

  3. If the DEA wishes to gain adherents, it really should renounce such a weak representation of its anti-marijuana stance. Long story short, anyone who advocates for the criminalization of medical marijuana patients primarily on the grounds that smoking it is harmful must also address vaporization as an alternative means of delivery. If they do not, then they are either too ignorant to have a valid opinion on the subject or they are deliberately engaging in sophistry. This past January, the DEA put out a position paper of their own, which I’ll have to address next time.¬† Read the rest of this entry »


Links for May 31, 2011

May 1, 2011

  • A glimpse into our future?

  • I’d like to follow the Gary Johnson campaign. Read the rest of this entry »


  • Links for January 24, 2011: Planet Money Compares Socialism and Libertarianism; When Is a Mural not a Mural?; SCOTUS Revisits “Knock and Announce”; others….

    January 23, 2011

    Thomas E. Woods, Jr.

  • Tom Woods | People Who Deserve to Be Better Known

    I knew one only one of the five on this list. I’m sure you will be reading more from them all here in no time. Thanks to Tom Woods for sharing, and I’m glad to pass it along!

  • http://public.npr.org/anon.npr-mp3/npr/blog/2010/09/20100917_blog_pmoney.mp3?_kip_ipx=1874937601-1295886944

    Nice talk with socialist economic professor Richard Wolff. If anyone out there could possibly convince me that socialism is the way to go, it would be a professor of economics who believes it. I don’t believe he makes his case here in this segment, but I’m sure it would be impossible to do so in such a small window time.

    Wolff seems to think that part of the problem with capitalism is that there is a conflict of interest between business leaders and laborers. Of course there is such a conflict, but in a world of scarce resources, there will always be conflicts of interest between producers and consumers. Everybody has an interest in producing less and consuming more, and that interest conflicts with everyone else’s interest to do the same. Abolishing capitalism will not alter this reality.

    Wolff advocates a more democratic workplace. He evidently wants rules of some kind that would limit the types of businesses that people are allowed to create. Only those businesses that allow workers the prescribed amount of say in the goings on of the business are to be permitted. Wolff does not say here whether he expects everyone to adhere to these rules voluntarily or if he has in mind some sort of enforcement apparatus. But here in our capitalist society, people are perfectly free to create democratic workplaces. The usually do not, because they want a certain amount of control over their own creations and they want to ensure adequate returns for themselves. If all these other rules are placed upon the act of starting a business, I’m sure you will see far fewer people willing to take the risk.

    Not that I’m entitled to the increased productivity the a capitalist societies, but why not freedom? Nobody forces one particular person to work for another particular person, and nobody should force business models that they find appealing on the entrepreneurs who are producing, innovating, and making things happen.

  • http://public.npr.org/anon.npr-mp3/npr/blog/2010/09/20100921_blog_pmpod.mp3?_kip_ipx=1614643902-1295887909

    Adam Davidson: I’m just trying to think how my life would be different [in a libertarian society].

    David Boaz: You would be much richer, you would be happier, you would be better looking, you would be taller.

    Adam Davidson: Would I be stronger?

    DB: Absolutely.

    AD: Could I eat fattening foods but somehow maintain a slim physique?

    DB: Yes, probably. … With faster economic growth, we’d have better technology. And we probably would have all these miracle fats that don’t put any weight on you.

    This is the promised Libertarian follow-up to the above discussion with a socialist. The exchange above, I’m sure, is a tongue-in-cheek jab at those who describe libertarians as utopian. Do not take it all literally, but we surely would at least have faster economic growth. It’s a shame that I feel like I have to explain this.¬† Read the rest of this entry »


  • Links for January 17, 2011: “An American Conversation” on Tucson, Drug Prohibition, etc.

    January 16, 2011
  • Reason.tv once again lives up to its name.

  • On January 5, 2011, a gang of gun-wielding thugs rampaged into a private residence and killed a grandfather of 12. My question is: Were the killers inspired by violent “drug war” rhetoric, or were they simply crazy? It is time for an American Conversation on the tragedy in Framingham. Raids like this are conducted over 100 times each day across America. Yes, people die.

  • Vodpod videos no longer available.

    ANN COULTER: I have one statement for you: the welfare state. No, people can not do whatever they want to do and live however they want to live, as long as Ann has to pay for it, when they can’t hold a job and raise their own kids and buy their own food and pay for their own rent. You get rid of the welfare state and we’ll talk about people sitting home and shooting heroin all day, but right now, oh, and now I have to pay for their health care!

    JOHN STOSSEL: So because we have a social welfare system, we have to give up these other freedoms?

    ANN: Yeah, as long as Ann is paying for it.

    Ann Coulter is a little more forthright than the average prohibitionist. Her argument is that since the government is forcing her to pay for something, then it might as well be what she wants most of all, which is to bastille her fellow citizens when she disapproves of their private, personal conduct. If she weren’t forced to pay for something, she might then be open to not paying out of her own pocket to imprison people who have committed no crimes against her or others.

    If Ann doesn’t want government health care money and living expenses to go to drug addicts, then her solution is counter-productive. Even prior to ObamaCare, the only people in the United States of America who have been constitutionally entitled to state-funded health care have been prisoners. Her argument, essentially, is: “I don’t want to pay for drug addicts’ health care food, room, and board, but I love throwing them all in jail, where I’m guaranteed to pay for all of their health care, food, room, and board. It is more important to Ann that we throw drug users in jail than it is that we save Ann’s tax money.”

    That is the logic of prohibition. For more hemming, hawing, evading, and stammering, see part 2:

    Vodpod videos no longer available.

    You can decide for yourselves whether the logic of prohibition wins the day. Read the rest of this entry »


  • Links for December 13, 2010. A little bit of raid, a little bit of Wikileaks, a little bit of fire.

    December 12, 2010

    Journalistically irresponsible photo of an unrelated SWAT team.

  • Dan Viets, Tebeau’s attorney, says the November 1 raid on Camp Zoe involved about 80 federal agents and they “didn’t find so much as a roach” on the property.”There were several dozen federal agents from all the alphabet soups — IRS, DEA, ATF — backed up by local cops who came onto the property with federal subpoenas,” Viets says. “They basically asked for business records, which they got.”

    The DEA and U.S. Attorney’s Office declined to comment on the specifics of the ongoing investigation.

    An official statement published on the Camp Zoe website says “one patron was arrested for previous warrants unrelated to Camp Zoe.” The message also says, “the same day the DEA seized all the money in the Camp Zoe bank account — which included most of the gate receipts for the Spookstock 9 weekend. This money was to be used to pay staff, artists, security, production (lights & sound), trash pickup, etc. for the festival weekend. It was also to be used for the basic bills for Camp Zoe to get the business through the winter.”

    Grand theft campground. Absolutely abominable. Those who do not speak out against the War on Drugs tacitly support this. On a lighter note, I used to listen to a podcasted radio program hosted by Dan Viets out of KOPN Columbia, Missourim, called Sex, Drugs, and Civil Liberties. It does not seem to have podcasted since last July, but man it was great. Dan, you are an inspiration.

  • Is the violence drug related, or prohibition related? It is tough to tell from the article….

  • New chaiman of the House monetary policy subcommittee.

  • Rep. Ron Paul, Chairman, Domestic Monetary Policy Subcommittee

    Jurisdiction: Domestic monetary policy, currency, precious metals, valuation of the dollar, economic stabilization, defense production, commodity prices, financial aid to commerce and industry

    Oh yeah! Bring it!

    Read the rest of this entry »