Links for March 21, 2010: Backlog O’Links 2

March 13, 2011
  • It just makes sense.

  • But it’s been a challenge to convince anyone otherwise. “This is the heart of the problem—money from the Byrne grants,” Piper says. It’s money for overtime. Money for promotions. It’s policing for profit.”

    This great Philadelphia Weekly cover story highlights the embarrassing racial disparity among marijuana arrestees. There is also a great discussion on police incentives to boost pot arrests to show they are making use of stimulus money. And for what? Marijuana prohibition is simply crooked all around.   Read the rest of this entry »


  • Links for December 27, 2010: Four Loko and Net-Neutrality

    December 26, 2010
  • You can not really understand a moral panic like this in rational terms. … You can still mix Red Bull and vodka.

  • I’m not really a computer wizard, so I can’t speak about the the accuracy and completeness, but the last 17 seconds of the video explains why the net-neutrality movement has not yet won me over.

  • Read the rest of this entry »


    Links for July 19, 2010: To Stimulate or Not To Stimulate; What Police Can Do; much, much more….

    July 18, 2010

      Paul Krugman: Boost aggregate demand! Muahahaha!!!

    1. It’s good to hear Krugman speak and respond to questions. The thrust of this discussion is that the opposition to the stimulus is a visceral reaction, not an intelligent one. Although some guests early on questioned the empirical efficacy of the stimulus, we did really not hear from any Thomas E. Woodses or any Peter Schiffs who maintained, in quite an intellectual fashion, that the stimulus is simply bad economic policy. Krugman remarks toward the end that he doesn’t see stimulus jobs as “makework” jobs. I do not understand how this position can be honestly defended alongside the position that we now need government to “boost aggregate demand”, i.e. create demand where none existed before. What is the purpose of the stimulus if it is not to “make work”? If these were not “makework” jobs, we would do them anyway. We would not need an economic crisis as a pretense for passing $700 billion spending bills. For a response to the assertion that Roosevelt’s slashing of the deficits caused a recession in 1937, see this. For a response to the assertion that World War II spending lifted the U.S. economy out of the depression, listen here, starting at 32:17.  Read the rest of this entry »


    Links for July 12, 2010: Is the Energy Star Program a Rubber Stamp?; Much Ado About the Economy, Economics; Much, Much More!

    July 11, 2010
    1. The Government Accountability Office tested the government’s Energy Star program with phony products and found it essentially to be a rubber stamp–except that only 15 of 20 products were accepted and two were rejected.  I wish they’d explained the rejections in a little more detail.

    2. Every time a libertarian stays in the closet, an angel gets its wings ripped off.

    3. We need you out here!!! I highly recommend listening to Mises.org podcasts and watching Reason.tv. After a while, you’ll come to realize that you have ready responses to every statist argument that comes down the tube.  Also, take Christopher Hitchens’s sage advice to heart.

    4. “The Conscience of a Liberal”: Calling your opponent “bizarre” and “crazy” = Checkmate!!! See full ThinkMarkets.wordpress.com response hereRead the rest of this entry »


    links for 2010-02-03

    February 4, 2010
    1. Freedom From Religion Foundation | Freethought Radio, Podcast Will Continue

      Air America has folded, but, the show will still air on Madison, Wisconsin’s local radio, among others, and, thanks to the Interwebs, we can all still enjoy a little Freethought Radio.

    2. reason.tv | 3 Reasons Not To Sweat The Citizens United Ruling

      To be completely fair about campaign finance law, my understanding was that it limits what corporations could spend, not what they could say. Still, the effect of the law was to censor a political film—based on its political message—right in the middle of election season. I don’t see how the First Amendment’s guarantee of press freedom can permit that to happen.

    3. Information Is Beautiful | Climate Change Deniers vs The Consensus

      Well, it looks like the “Denier” position is now popular enough to merit rebuttal. Read the rest of this entry »