Links for October 17, 2011: Protesters arrested for demonstrating inside of Citibank; Justice Scalia eschews federal drug prohibition; More economic myths.

October 15, 2011
  1. Well, this really happened (see video). The truth, however, did not stop such prominent blogs as Daily Kos and InfoWars from uncritically repeating the facially ridiculous claim that over twenty customers were arrested for nothing other then asking tellers to have their accounts closed. The blogosphere lit up in the meantime. By the end of the next day, two of my progressive friends on facebook had unquestioningly posted the fraudulent headline to their news feeds. Some people, it seems, will swallow, without a second thought, just about any accusation leveled against a corporation.

    Two days later, Daily Kos published the above clarification explaining exactly what happened inside the bank: a disruptive demonstration, and not an innocent series of business proposals. InfoWars, on the other hand is staying the course. It has published a new story called Big Banks Refuse To Let People Close Accounts, which not only reiterates the hideous libel, but alleges further that banks all across America are forbidding “people” (people who carry signs or bullhorns into the banks, that is) from closing their accounts. No shame.

  2. Come on, people. Let’s repeal federal drug laws and free up Scalia’s Wednesdays for golf. He needs it.

  3. Responding to each of Kevin Drum’s claims here will take a bit too long. I’ve begun a feature on this, which I hope to finish some time soon (I think I have three half-finished drafts cooking). Suffice to say here that Austrian economists have already presponded to these claims, and the Austrian presponses have been predictably ignored.

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.


Links of August 9th, 2011: The Prophet Ron; S&P Debt Downgrade; Fashion Police; a Liter of Light; others…..

August 7, 2011
  1. Ron Paul predicted the fall of the housing market as early as 2003.

    I think I’m leaning toward Gary Johnson this time around because I like him better on social issues, but I will gladly pass this on, as I would be just about as satisfied with a Ron Paul win in 2012.

  2. Who are “Standard & Poor’s” and why do they hate America? Either they are with us or they are with the terrorists.

  3. If the DEA wishes to gain adherents, it really should renounce such a weak representation of its anti-marijuana stance. Long story short, anyone who advocates for the criminalization of medical marijuana patients primarily on the grounds that smoking it is harmful must also address vaporization as an alternative means of delivery. If they do not, then they are either too ignorant to have a valid opinion on the subject or they are deliberately engaging in sophistry. This past January, the DEA put out a position paper of their own, which I’ll have to address next time.  Read the rest of this entry »


Links for Monday, June 27, 2011: Marine Killed in Drug Raid; How to Create a Job; Intro to Constitutional Law; others….

May 22, 2011
  1. Raw video: PCSD helmet cam clip shows SWAT raid and shooting

    The raid that killed marine Jose Guerena. Story above.

  2. The officers were mistaken in believing Mr. Guerena fired at them. However, when Mr. Guerena raised the AR-15 semi-automatic assault rifle in their direction, they needed to take immediate action to stop the deadly threat against them.

    Police need to try to understand: when a team of them kick down someone’s door for no good reason and infiltrate with guns drawn, they are guests in the other people’s homes.

  3. I’m not necessarily agreeing that cutting government and regulations is a “race to the bottom”, but they are asking the right questions about government claims of job creation. Read the rest of this entry »


Links for March 21, 2010: Backlog O’Links 2

March 13, 2011
  • It just makes sense.

  • But it’s been a challenge to convince anyone otherwise. “This is the heart of the problem—money from the Byrne grants,” Piper says. It’s money for overtime. Money for promotions. It’s policing for profit.”

    This great Philadelphia Weekly cover story highlights the embarrassing racial disparity among marijuana arrestees. There is also a great discussion on police incentives to boost pot arrests to show they are making use of stimulus money. And for what? Marijuana prohibition is simply crooked all around.   Read the rest of this entry »


  • Links for January 31, 2011: This is the War on Drugs. Any Questions?; Thoughts on the Depression of 1920.

    January 30, 2011
  • “He was not a dealer,” Arlean Blair insists. “I know that he used … but he was not a drug dealer. A drug dealer has lots of money and nice things. If you looked in his house, he had nothing. He gave everything away to people who were having trouble. … It isn’t clear from evidence logs whether investigators found the drugs they were looking for. There was paraphernalia and ‘a small, pink plastic bag with a white crystal substance.’”

    The Weber County Attorney’s Office found the shooting to be legally justified under Utah Law. This is drugs. This is the War on Drugs. Any questions?

  • The Austrian School’s “Great Depression of 1920″ line of reasoning goes like this: Following the First World War, America fell into a depression the first year of which was worse than that of the Great Depression. The government then did very little in the way of stimulus then, and the economy recovered basically on its own within a couple of years. By the 1929, America saw the onset of the Great Depression. Over a decade of New Deal government intervention did not get us out of that depression. To the contrary, New Deal meddling prolonged the Great Depression. Over a year and a half has passed since I first heard this account, and I have not come across so much as a peep in response from the interventionists….until now. The Austrian Review of Economics first published this article online in late October, 2010. I have not yet read this article because it costs $34 to download, but the author, Daniel Kuehn, responds to a critique of the article here.

  • Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.


    Links for January 24, 2011: Planet Money Compares Socialism and Libertarianism; When Is a Mural not a Mural?; SCOTUS Revisits “Knock and Announce”; others….

    January 23, 2011

    Thomas E. Woods, Jr.

  • Tom Woods | People Who Deserve to Be Better Known

    I knew one only one of the five on this list. I’m sure you will be reading more from them all here in no time. Thanks to Tom Woods for sharing, and I’m glad to pass it along!

  • http://public.npr.org/anon.npr-mp3/npr/blog/2010/09/20100917_blog_pmoney.mp3?_kip_ipx=1874937601-1295886944

    Nice talk with socialist economic professor Richard Wolff. If anyone out there could possibly convince me that socialism is the way to go, it would be a professor of economics who believes it. I don’t believe he makes his case here in this segment, but I’m sure it would be impossible to do so in such a small window time.

    Wolff seems to think that part of the problem with capitalism is that there is a conflict of interest between business leaders and laborers. Of course there is such a conflict, but in a world of scarce resources, there will always be conflicts of interest between producers and consumers. Everybody has an interest in producing less and consuming more, and that interest conflicts with everyone else’s interest to do the same. Abolishing capitalism will not alter this reality.

    Wolff advocates a more democratic workplace. He evidently wants rules of some kind that would limit the types of businesses that people are allowed to create. Only those businesses that allow workers the prescribed amount of say in the goings on of the business are to be permitted. Wolff does not say here whether he expects everyone to adhere to these rules voluntarily or if he has in mind some sort of enforcement apparatus. But here in our capitalist society, people are perfectly free to create democratic workplaces. The usually do not, because they want a certain amount of control over their own creations and they want to ensure adequate returns for themselves. If all these other rules are placed upon the act of starting a business, I’m sure you will see far fewer people willing to take the risk.

    Not that I’m entitled to the increased productivity the a capitalist societies, but why not freedom? Nobody forces one particular person to work for another particular person, and nobody should force business models that they find appealing on the entrepreneurs who are producing, innovating, and making things happen.

  • http://public.npr.org/anon.npr-mp3/npr/blog/2010/09/20100921_blog_pmpod.mp3?_kip_ipx=1614643902-1295887909

    Adam Davidson: I’m just trying to think how my life would be different [in a libertarian society].

    David Boaz: You would be much richer, you would be happier, you would be better looking, you would be taller.

    Adam Davidson: Would I be stronger?

    DB: Absolutely.

    AD: Could I eat fattening foods but somehow maintain a slim physique?

    DB: Yes, probably. … With faster economic growth, we’d have better technology. And we probably would have all these miracle fats that don’t put any weight on you.

    This is the promised Libertarian follow-up to the above discussion with a socialist. The exchange above, I’m sure, is a tongue-in-cheek jab at those who describe libertarians as utopian. Do not take it all literally, but we surely would at least have faster economic growth. It’s a shame that I feel like I have to explain this.  Read the rest of this entry »


  • Links for January 17, 2011: “An American Conversation” on Tucson, Drug Prohibition, etc.

    January 16, 2011
  • Reason.tv once again lives up to its name.

  • On January 5, 2011, a gang of gun-wielding thugs rampaged into a private residence and killed a grandfather of 12. My question is: Were the killers inspired by violent “drug war” rhetoric, or were they simply crazy? It is time for an American Conversation on the tragedy in Framingham. Raids like this are conducted over 100 times each day across America. Yes, people die.

  • ANN COULTER: I have one statement for you: the welfare state. No, people can not do whatever they want to do and live however they want to live, as long as Ann has to pay for it, when they can’t hold a job and raise their own kids and buy their own food and pay for their own rent. You get rid of the welfare state and we’ll talk about people sitting home and shooting heroin all day, but right now, oh, and now I have to pay for their health care!

    JOHN STOSSEL: So because we have a social welfare system, we have to give up these other freedoms?

    ANN: Yeah, as long as Ann is paying for it.

    Ann Coulter is a little more forthright than the average prohibitionist. Her argument is that since the government is forcing her to pay for something, then it might as well be what she wants most of all, which is to bastille her fellow citizens when she disapproves of their private, personal conduct. If she weren’t forced to pay for something, she might then be open to not paying out of her own pocket to imprison people who have committed no crimes against her or others.

    If Ann doesn’t want government health care money and living expenses to go to drug addicts, then her solution is counter-productive. Even prior to ObamaCare, the only people in the United States of America who have been constitutionally entitled to state-funded health care have been prisoners. Her argument, essentially, is: “I don’t want to pay for drug addicts’ health care food, room, and board, but I love throwing them all in jail, where I’m guaranteed to pay for all of their health care, food, room, and board. It is more important to Ann that we throw drug users in jail than it is that we save Ann’s tax money.”

    That is the logic of prohibition. For more hemming, hawing, evading, and stammering, see part 2:

    You can decide for yourselves whether the logic of prohibition wins the day. Read the rest of this entry »


  • Follow

    Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

    Join 429 other followers