Overdue Links for February 6, 2011: FDA regulates stem cells as drugs; Obama ignores marijuana questions; Krugman pooh-poohs austerity; others….

February 12, 2012

    "Hold it right there, mister. Are those stem cells 'safe and effective'?"

  1. Stem cells, like other medical products that are intended to treat, cure, or prevent disease, generally require FDA approval before they can be marketed. At this time, there are no licensed stem cell treatments.”

    The article links to the actual FDA opinion. Over/under: How many tens of thousands of people to you think will die unnecessarily while awaiting awaiting the FDA to approve this procedure?

  2. Death by bureaucracy.

  3. How will Obama dance around it tonight? Let’s find out….

  4. [I]t ought to be obvious to everyone that something is very wrong when this many people keep asking the same question and the president has nothing to say.

    Completely ignored this time. Not even laughed at. The amazing thing was that the top questions were all posted right under the video as it aired. The powers that be here did not even try to cover up the blaring silence.

  5. Paul Krugman here in full flower. Usually missing from these austerity-bashing editorials is some indication that the government either actually has, or can reasonably obtain, the money that they are supposed to spend to jump-start the economy. Where is this money cming from? I’m looking for something like this. The concern is usually dismissed, a la Kevin Drum, as a can that may be safely kicked down the road. I say, “No. Let’s talk about that ish right now!”

  6. Politically motivated expulsion of cameramen from a hearing room. Pretty lame.

  7. I hope this means we can forget about it by year’s end. Maybe 2013 will be the “Year of the Bhagavad Gītā”.

  8. Here in America, I’m pretty sure that the court would not touch a case like this due to Establishment Clause concerns. Personally, I would be satisfied with leaving a record that I was baptized as a baby, presumably without my consent, and that I had voluntarily chosen to leave the church. I ain’t in it to re-write my history and say that what had happened did not happen.

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.


Links for September 27, 2010: Much Ado about the Tea Party, Unequal Justice Before the Law, others…

September 26, 2010

Anyone for Tea? (photo: miya)

  1. One sign of the tea party movement’s success is that the term “tea party” is becoming an all-purpose smear term for any more-or-less right-wing person or activity that the writer doesn’t like. In fact, I think “Tea Party” is replacing “neocon” as an all-purpose word for “the people I hate.”

  2. I’m glad we got that out of the way. Maybe after tea-partiers learn to “eye” people correctly, we can graduate to talking about the real issues.

  3. No longer content with bellowing accusations of racism, I see we’ve graduated to accusations of terrorism. Is Jen Phillips seems more interested in having the whole of the Tea Party movement added to the list of terror threats than she is in having Climate Ground Zero removed—for little more than supporting and defending the Second Amendment. Read the rest of this entry »


links for 2010-02-15

February 16, 2010
  1. ACLJ | The Parade of Horribles

    Imagine if everyone exercised their religious liberty. What a horrible world that would be, right? Sekulow asserts that the Satanists and the Wiccans already have a right to meet for religious purposes. This is the same Jay Sekulow who neglected to mention that the Mojave Desert Cross case began when the federal government denied a Buddhist's request to erect a shrine on federally owned land in the vicinity of the cross. Instead, Sekulow carried on as if the horrible, godless people of America attacked the Christian Cross without provocation. Again with the borderline dishonesty.

  2. ACLJ | Context of the Ten Commandments

    I find Sekulow's assessment of the proper context within which to display the Ten Commandments very interesting. I thought he was going to say that if you were teaching theology and you have up quotes and laws from other religious texts, then it should be no trouble to post the Ten. Instead he believes there should be no trouble with the law if the Ten are posted alongside the Bill of Rights and the Declaration of Independence. This is an example of the belief that the Ten Commandments is among America's foundational documents. Despite its influence among our nation's founders, I would not categorize it that way.

  3. NYDailyNews.com | Queens girl Alexa Gonzalez hauled out of school in handcuffs after getting caught doodling on desk

    Queens police have nothing better to do, I guess. Read the rest of this entry »


In Re Adoption of E., or Cracks in an Imaginary Wall

September 15, 2008

Ever since I posted Legal thought of the Day, No. 2, regarding Connecticut’s early-nineteenth-century  blasphemy and apostasy laws, I’ve become very much interested in the legal history of Atheism in America.  Personally, I have never found the arguments in favor of the existence of the God of the Bible, or any other God for that matter, to be very convincing.  It fascinates me to think that if I had publicly voiced this opinion in colonial America, a group of nations purportedly founded upon the principle of Religious Liberty, I would have lost my civil liberties at best and my life at worst.

Read the rest of this entry »


Legal Thought of the Day: No. 9

July 8, 2008

It was proved, unanswerably, on the trial, that Amos Gridley, a witness offered by the defendant, had, deliberately, within three months of the trial, declared his disbelief in a God, and a future state of rewards and punishments; that he had said, man was like a beast, and when he died, there was an end of him. Read the rest of this entry »


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